ACT Now

ACT Now
ACT Now
ACT NOW is the Silentinjuries™ mantra. The mantra advocates four basic principles. The principles are not curative: rather, effective management strategies to neutralize disruptions to healthy adjustment subsequent to deviance exposure. Effectively using the strategies often requires cognitive and behavioral change.
Acknowledge
Acknowledging exposure(s) to social-sexual deviance is the first ACT NOW principle. Simplified, two steps are required to complete this cognitive self-guided injury management phase. Accepting one’s life experience includes exposure to deviance is the first step. Next, it is essential to accept deviance is a psychological toxin that yields predictable injuries. Though there are many reasons people fail to acknowledge their exposure(s) to deviance, the most toxic reason is failing to recognize any exposure to deviance translates to experiencing a violent act.
Confront
Confronting exposure(s) to social-sexual deviance is the second ACT NOW principle. This is a behavioral objective. The objective is to identify a healthy resource and talk about the exposure and subsequent disruption to healthy adjustment.
Treatment
Treatment is the third ACT NOW principle. Treatment occurs on a continuum. In other words it is variable depending upon the exposure to deviance, pre-existing health challenges and expectations. A comprehensive Trauma Assessment is the headwater to establishing a traumatic injury management plan.
NOW
NOW is the fourth principle. It is a call to action that is disruptive to the many potential injuries people can experience following exposure to deviance. By taking action NOW, the risk to develop PTSD is significantly reduced as immediate healthy actions serve to disrupt avoidant behavior. Habituated avoidant behaviors that can emerge include substance abuse, depression, sexual promiscuity, sexual aggression and others.
Is Social-Sexual Deviance a Carcinogen?
The World Health Organization broadly defines violence as intentionally engaging in behavior that predictably causes or will more likely than not cause psychological, emotional and/or physical injury.  Learn More

Deviance, like cancer is an uncontrolled division of cells. Both are observed within single cells, larger cellular groupings and can ultimately bring death to the host body. Violence is the unifying thread to social and/or sexual deviance. Exposure to violence can cause a firestorm that consumes one’s psychological, emotional and physical health and leaves an indelible footprint. There is increasing research that demonstrates childhood exposure to deviance increases lifetime risk to develop cancer. Learn More

Neutralizing Toxin Exposure
Exposure to social-sexual deviance is always a stressor. The subsequent mental, emotional and/or physical strain more often than not leaves silent traumatic injuries. However, the subsequent trauma related injuries are uneven and influenced by many different factors. The pathway to resolve childhood exposure to social-sexual deviance related injuries and to heal one’s spirit consist of nine steps. These nine steps are as follows:

  1. Acknowledging one’s childhood development included exposure to social and sexual deviance.
  2. Identifying the molester and accepting sexual deviance motivated the molester’s behavior and social deviance made possible the abuse process.
  3. Defining the abuse process.
  4. Acknowledging the strategies one used to psychologically survive the abuse process.
  5. Acknowledging the ways one misinterpreted the abuse process and the subsequent mistaken ideas one formed about oneself, others, and human sexuality.
  6. Recognizing and acknowledging the thinking errors one uses to discourage intimate relationships.
  7. Defining one’s psychological and social assumed disabilities that are obstacles to cultivating and sustaining intimate relationships.
  8. Defining self independent of the abuse process and the subsequent trauma symptomatology. 
  9. Cultivating a support system to maintain the healthy coping responses one develops to manage traumatic injuries and one’s overall health.

Confronting the exposure to deviance is the common element to each health restoring step. This disrupts the social/sexual isolation the deviant imposed and ultimately translates to neutralizing the toxin.